Trends Archives

LEARNING ABOUT FIDGETING WHILE FIDGETING

Since it is more than quite likely that the editor of the Association’s newsletter experienced some fidgeting while preparing this edition, it is possible that some readers also could undergo something comparable while reading it. According to an article that was published in the October 2019 issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience, psychologists have ascribed fidgeting to boredom, a form of stress relief, or perhaps as a subconscious way to increase memory. Also, fidgeting may take place even when one seemingly is engaged actively in a task. It is unclear, however, the process by which fidgets go about modulating their neural activity across the brain. Certain brain regions drive actions (such as motor cortex) and many others receive this information (such as sensory areas), in part to distinguish self-generated from movements that are not self-generated. Investigators who participated in the study reported in the aforementioned publication show that in expert mice performing a task, movements that are not task-related dominate the single-trial neural activity. This finding is exciting because it underlines why measuring behavior and other variables are key for exploring the neural code. Apart from whatever value might be associated with this discovery, as an aside it also might be somewhat comforting to know that somewhere out there, a group of expert mice is working on our behalf to enhance a more human-oriented understanding of neural activity.

More Articles from October 2019 TRENDS

THE VALUE OF GLANCING IN THE REARVIEW MIRROR

Indicates why it is worthwhile to examine professional literature archives to learn more about present day challenges involving both allied health and genomics. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on recently completing a two-year term as ASAHP President. Read More

 

THE DANCE OF LEGISLATION

A book published in 1973 bearing this title shows how over the decades, certain patterns continue to remain in effect. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses recent efforts to curtail waste, fraud, and abuse in programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, along with some reflections on how to reduce administrative expenditures. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes new activity in the regulatory domain, plus recently introduced legislation to protect students when colleges close and reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Death Rates By Marital Status For Adults Age 25 And Older: United States, 2010-2017

  • Prevalence Of Screening For Social Determinants Of Health

  • Hierarchical Encoding Of Attended Auditory Objects In Multi-Talker Speech Perception

  • Exergaming And Virtual Reality For Health: Implications For Cardiac Rehabilitation Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Preparing The Current And Future Health Care Workforce For Interprofessional Practice

  • Integrating Social Care Into The Delivery Of Health Care

  • Older Americans’ Views On Navigating The Health Care System

  • Survey On State And Local Income, Poverty, And Health Insurance Statistics Read More

EVIDENCE FOR LATINO PREFERENCES FOR METAPHOR AND ANALOGY  

Mentions how a stronger liking for and a desire to connect with individuals who use metaphoric speech can have an impact on the quality of health care services. Read More

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE AFFECTS WOMEN AND MEN DIFFERENTLY

Refers to a recognition that the two groups differ in the risk of developing this disease, how it progresses, and survivor rates. Read More

 

LEARNING ABOUT FIDGETING WHILE FIDGETING

Despite efforts by parents and teachers to discourage children from fidgeting, this form of behavior may persist in adulthood, while a clearer understanding of its neural origins is enhanced by contributions made by expert mice. Read More

PARKINSON’S DISEASE AFFECTS WOMEN AND MEN DIFFERENTLY

Not all demographic groups are affected by disease pathophysiology in the same way as shown in a review published in the August 2019 issue of the Journal of Parkinson's Disease. Growing evidence indicates that Parkinson's disease (PD) affects women and men differently. The article presents the most recent knowledge about these sex-related differences and highlights the significance of estrogens, which play an important role in the sex differences in PD. Although the risk of developing this disease is twice as high in men than women, it is women who experience a more rapid disease progression and a lower survival rate. By drawing attention to sex-related differences and disparities in PD, the investigators hope that recently gained knowledge will further encourage the scientific community and policy makers to foster the development of tailored interventions and the design of innovative programs - for example in care practices - that meet the distinct requirements of women and men with PD.

More Articles from October 2019 TRENDS

THE VALUE OF GLANCING IN THE REARVIEW MIRROR

Indicates why it is worthwhile to examine professional literature archives to learn more about present day challenges involving both allied health and genomics. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on recently completing a two-year term as ASAHP President. Read More

 

THE DANCE OF LEGISLATION

A book published in 1973 bearing this title shows how over the decades, certain patterns continue to remain in effect. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses recent efforts to curtail waste, fraud, and abuse in programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, along with some reflections on how to reduce administrative expenditures. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes new activity in the regulatory domain, plus recently introduced legislation to protect students when colleges close and reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Death Rates By Marital Status For Adults Age 25 And Older: United States, 2010-2017

  • Prevalence Of Screening For Social Determinants Of Health

  • Hierarchical Encoding Of Attended Auditory Objects In Multi-Talker Speech Perception

  • Exergaming And Virtual Reality For Health: Implications For Cardiac Rehabilitation Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Preparing The Current And Future Health Care Workforce For Interprofessional Practice

  • Integrating Social Care Into The Delivery Of Health Care

  • Older Americans’ Views On Navigating The Health Care System

  • Survey On State And Local Income, Poverty, And Health Insurance Statistics Read More

EVIDENCE FOR LATINO PREFERENCES FOR METAPHOR AND ANALOGY  

Mentions how a stronger liking for and a desire to connect with individuals who use metaphoric speech can have an impact on the quality of health care services. Read More

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE AFFECTS WOMEN AND MEN DIFFERENTLY

Refers to a recognition that the two groups differ in the risk of developing this disease, how it progresses, and survivor rates. Read More

 

LEARNING ABOUT FIDGETING WHILE FIDGETING

Despite efforts by parents and teachers to discourage children from fidgeting, this form of behavior may persist in adulthood, while a clearer understanding of its neural origins is enhanced by contributions made by expert mice. Read More

EVIDENCE FOR LATINO PREFERENCES FOR METAPHOR AND ANALOGY

It is not too surprising to come to a realization that individuals from different cultures may be inclined to communicate and describe the world differently. A manuscript in the November 2019 issue of the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin documents one such cultural difference previously unexplored by psychologists: receptiveness to metaphors. Spanish-speaking Latinos were contrasted with Anglo-Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos who do not habitually speak Spanish. Across four experiments, the investigators showed that relative to these other groups, Spanish-speaking Latinos show stronger preferences for metaphoric definitions, better recall of metaphors, greater trust in both scientific and political arguments that use metaphor, and stronger liking for and desire to connect with persons who use metaphoric speech. Given the substantial representation of Latinos throughout the United States, it definitely is worth considering future directions and implications for improving cross-cultural communication.

Recognizing that Spanish-speaking Latinos display a relatively stronger preference for metaphors in defining abstract constructs and in demonstrating enhanced memory for metaphors in narratives, the findings are particularly relevant in the health care arena. Great emphasis is placed today on how health status is affected by social determinants. Language differences can have a decisive impact on the ability to achieve positive health outcomes. Thus, both from the perspective of patients describing their symptoms to health care practitioners and in their obtaining a greater understanding of diagnostic terminology, the use of metaphors is a tool that can play a highly valuable role.

More Articles from October 2019 TRENDS

THE VALUE OF GLANCING IN THE REARVIEW MIRROR

Indicates why it is worthwhile to examine professional literature archives to learn more about present day challenges involving both allied health and genomics. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on recently completing a two-year term as ASAHP President. Read More

 

THE DANCE OF LEGISLATION

A book published in 1973 bearing this title shows how over the decades, certain patterns continue to remain in effect. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses recent efforts to curtail waste, fraud, and abuse in programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, along with some reflections on how to reduce administrative expenditures. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes new activity in the regulatory domain, plus recently introduced legislation to protect students when colleges close and reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Death Rates By Marital Status For Adults Age 25 And Older: United States, 2010-2017

  • Prevalence Of Screening For Social Determinants Of Health

  • Hierarchical Encoding Of Attended Auditory Objects In Multi-Talker Speech Perception

  • Exergaming And Virtual Reality For Health: Implications For Cardiac Rehabilitation Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Preparing The Current And Future Health Care Workforce For Interprofessional Practice

  • Integrating Social Care Into The Delivery Of Health Care

  • Older Americans’ Views On Navigating The Health Care System

  • Survey On State And Local Income, Poverty, And Health Insurance Statistics Read More

EVIDENCE FOR LATINO PREFERENCES FOR METAPHOR AND ANALOGY  

Mentions how a stronger liking for and a desire to connect with individuals who use metaphoric speech can have an impact on the quality of health care services. Read More

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE AFFECTS WOMEN AND MEN DIFFERENTLY

Refers to a recognition that the two groups differ in the risk of developing this disease, how it progresses, and survivor rates. Read More

 

LEARNING ABOUT FIDGETING WHILE FIDGETING

Despite efforts by parents and teachers to discourage children from fidgeting, this form of behavior may persist in adulthood, while a clearer understanding of its neural origins is enhanced by contributions made by expert mice. Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

Preparing The Current And Future Health Care Workforce For Interprofessional Practice

The Health Resources & Services Administration published a report, "Preparing the Current and Future Health Care Workforce for Interprofessional Practice in Sustainable, Age-Friendly Health Systems." It is the the 17th Annual Report authored by the Advisory Committee on Interdisciplinary Community-Based Linkages (ACICBL) to the Secretary of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and to the Congress. ACICBL is a Federal Advisory Committee that provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary on a broad range of issues dealing with programs and activities authorized under Title VII, Part D of the Public Health Service (PHS) Act. Recommendations provided in this iteration are designed to promote broad changes within the health care system to advance age-friendly practices, train the health care workforce in age-friendly care, and improve the care of older adults, while also facilitating the reduction of burnout and the promotion of wellness and resilience among health care providers. The report can be obtained here.

Integrating Social Care Into The Delivery Of Health Care

How can services that address social needs be integrated into clinical care? What kind of infrastructure will be needed to facilitate that integration? To begin answering such questions, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine assembled an expert committee to examine the potential for integrating social care services into the delivery of health care with the ultimate goal of achieving better and more equitable health outcomes. The resulting report, Integrating Social Care into the Delivery of Health Care: Moving Upstream to Improve the Nation’s Health, identifies and assesses current and emerging approaches and recommends ways to expand and optimize social care in the health care setting. It can be obtained here.

Older Americans’ Views On Navigating The Health Care System

A majority of older Americans who are ages 60+ (79%) are prepared to age well, but nearly 7 in 10 (68%) are at least somewhat concerned about their health as they age, and nearly half (46%) need assistance understanding their health insurance benefits once they have chosen a plan. A survey conducted by The Harris Poll, commissioned by Anthem, Inc. and the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging reveals that while most respondents are confident in some aspects of navigating the health care system, there is opportunity for better understanding of their benefits, bill, diagnosis, and treatment. Among the respondents, which included U.S. adults, 65% reported that they had some type of Medicare insurance coverage. The report can be obtained here.

Survey On State And Local Income, Poverty, And Health Insurance Statistics

The U.S. Census Bureau released its most detailed look at America’s inhabitants, places, and economy. New state and local statistics on income, poverty, and health insurance are available in briefs, detailed tables, data profiles, and more. The American Community Survey (ACS) also produces statistics for more than 40 other topics. Results can be obtained here.

More Articles from October 2019 TRENDS

THE VALUE OF GLANCING IN THE REARVIEW MIRROR

Indicates why it is worthwhile to examine professional literature archives to learn more about present day challenges involving both allied health and genomics. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on recently completing a two-year term as ASAHP President. Read More

 

THE DANCE OF LEGISLATION

A book published in 1973 bearing this title shows how over the decades, certain patterns continue to remain in effect. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses recent efforts to curtail waste, fraud, and abuse in programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, along with some reflections on how to reduce administrative expenditures. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes new activity in the regulatory domain, plus recently introduced legislation to protect students when colleges close and reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Death Rates By Marital Status For Adults Age 25 And Older: United States, 2010-2017

  • Prevalence Of Screening For Social Determinants Of Health

  • Hierarchical Encoding Of Attended Auditory Objects In Multi-Talker Speech Perception

  • Exergaming And Virtual Reality For Health: Implications For Cardiac Rehabilitation Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Preparing The Current And Future Health Care Workforce For Interprofessional Practice

  • Integrating Social Care Into The Delivery Of Health Care

  • Older Americans’ Views On Navigating The Health Care System

  • Survey On State And Local Income, Poverty, And Health Insurance Statistics Read More

EVIDENCE FOR LATINO PREFERENCES FOR METAPHOR AND ANALOGY  

Mentions how a stronger liking for and a desire to connect with individuals who use metaphoric speech can have an impact on the quality of health care services. Read More

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE AFFECTS WOMEN AND MEN DIFFERENTLY

Refers to a recognition that the two groups differ in the risk of developing this disease, how it progresses, and survivor rates. Read More

 

LEARNING ABOUT FIDGETING WHILE FIDGETING

Despite efforts by parents and teachers to discourage children from fidgeting, this form of behavior may persist in adulthood, while a clearer understanding of its neural origins is enhanced by contributions made by expert mice. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

Death Rates By Marital Status For Adults Age 25 And Older: United States, 2010-2017

A new report from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) presents trends for 2010–2017 in age-adjusted death rates by marital status (married, never married, divorced, or widowed) at the time of death for adults aged 25 and over. The age-adjusted death rate for married persons aged 25 and over was lower than for those who were never married, divorced, or widowed. It declined 7% (839.8 per 100,000 U.S. standard population), while the rate for never-married persons also declined, by 2% (from 1,466.1 to 1,443.6). The rate for widowed persons was the highest of all marital status groups and increased 6% during the period, from 1,567.2 in 2010 to 1,656.9 in 2017. The rate for divorced persons aged 25 and over was stable during the period and was 1,368.8 in 2017. Rates for married men were the lowest of all marital status groups and declined 7% from 2010 (1,012.1) to 2017 (942.9) while for women, rates also declined 7% between 2010 (612.1) and 2017 (569.3).

Prevalence Of Screening For Social Determinants Of Health

Social needs are linked to health outcomes. Identifying patients with unmet social needs is a necessary first step to addressing these needs, yet little is known about the prevalence of screening. Most hospitals and physician practices don’t screen patients for social determinants of health such as food insecurity, housing instability, utility and transportation needs, and interpersonal violence, according to a study described in the journal JAMA Network Open on September 18, 2019. Surveys administered from June 2017 to August 2018 to 2,190 physician practices and 739 hospitals found that about 16% of practices and 24% of hospitals reported screening for all five factors, while 8% of hospitals and 33% of practices screened for none. The most commonly screened-for factor was interpersonal violence, occurring at 75% of hospitals and 56% of practices. Almost 50% of academic hospitals reported screening, compared with 23% of hospitals overall. Facilities that serve economically disadvantaged patients were more likely to screen.

HEALTH TECHNOLOGY CORNER

Hierarchical Encoding Of Attended Auditory Objects In Multi-Talker Speech Perception

Humans easily can focus on one speaker in a multi-talker acoustic environment, but how different areas of the human auditory cortex (AC) represent the acoustic components of mixed speech is unknown. A team of Columbia University neuroengineers has uncovered the steps that take place in the brain to make this feat of picking out a single voice possible, according to an online article that became available in the journal Neuron on October 21, 2019. The discovery helps to solve a long-standing scientific question as to how the auditory cortex, the brain's listening center, can decode and amplify one voice over others -- at lightning-fast speeds. This new-found knowledge also stands to spur development of hearing-aid technologies and brain-computer interfaces that more closely resemble the brain. An end goal is to understand better how the brain enables individuals to hear so well, plus to create technologies so that stroke survivors can speak to loved ones, or to enable the hearing-impaired to converse more easily in a crowded setting.

Exergaming And Virtual Reality For Health: Implications For Cardiac Rehabilitation

According to an article published online September 12, 2019 in the journal Current Problems in Cardiology, cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programs focused on improving the health trajectory of patients with cardiovascular disease strive to increase physical activity (PA) and cardiorespiratory fitness. However, historically low compliance with recommended PA has prompted exploration of alternatives to traditional courses of exercise therapy. One alternative, exergaming, or the requirement of physical exercise inherent to a video game's activities, has shown to have a promising impact in improving patient self-efficacy for exercise training using digital hardware (e.g., the Wii or the Xbox Kinect). Moreover, novel technologies in virtual reality can provide an engaging, immersive environment for exergaming techniques, maximizing goal-oriented training, and building self-efficacy for patients during CR. The concept of a “Clinical Arcade” is introduced as a new approach to integration of these techniques in CR care.

More Articles from October 2019 TRENDS

THE VALUE OF GLANCING IN THE REARVIEW MIRROR

Indicates why it is worthwhile to examine professional literature archives to learn more about present day challenges involving both allied health and genomics. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on recently completing a two-year term as ASAHP President. Read More

 

THE DANCE OF LEGISLATION

A book published in 1973 bearing this title shows how over the decades, certain patterns continue to remain in effect. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses recent efforts to curtail waste, fraud, and abuse in programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, along with some reflections on how to reduce administrative expenditures. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes new activity in the regulatory domain, plus recently introduced legislation to protect students when colleges close and reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Death Rates By Marital Status For Adults Age 25 And Older: United States, 2010-2017

  • Prevalence Of Screening For Social Determinants Of Health

  • Hierarchical Encoding Of Attended Auditory Objects In Multi-Talker Speech Perception

  • Exergaming And Virtual Reality For Health: Implications For Cardiac Rehabilitation Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Preparing The Current And Future Health Care Workforce For Interprofessional Practice

  • Integrating Social Care Into The Delivery Of Health Care

  • Older Americans’ Views On Navigating The Health Care System

  • Survey On State And Local Income, Poverty, And Health Insurance Statistics Read More

EVIDENCE FOR LATINO PREFERENCES FOR METAPHOR AND ANALOGY  

Mentions how a stronger liking for and a desire to connect with individuals who use metaphoric speech can have an impact on the quality of health care services. Read More

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE AFFECTS WOMEN AND MEN DIFFERENTLY

Refers to a recognition that the two groups differ in the risk of developing this disease, how it progresses, and survivor rates. Read More

 

LEARNING ABOUT FIDGETING WHILE FIDGETING

Despite efforts by parents and teachers to discourage children from fidgeting, this form of behavior may persist in adulthood, while a clearer understanding of its neural origins is enhanced by contributions made by expert mice. Read More

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Apart from legislation that emerges on Capitol Hill, the regulatory arena plays a key role in determining how policies are implemented. A recent example occurred during the week of October 14, 2019 when the federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB) gave the necessary go-ahead signal to the Department of Education’s final proposal to overhaul college accreditation. This approval means the final regulation likely will be published soon. The proposed rule is intended to ease some requirements that college accreditors must meet to obtain federal recognition, an important status that enables the institutions they accredit to be eligible for federal student aid. An ongoing criticism by the Trump Administration is that the existing college accreditation system is too costly and burdensome.

Protecting Students From Sudden College Closures

Throughout 2019, administrators at some small institutions have announced that their doors soon will be closed. Declining student enrollment and an inability to finance rising costs often are cited as reasons for this decision. In response, on October 3, 2019, Representatives Donna Shalala (D-FL), Peter King (R-NY) and Sean Casten (D-IL) introduced a bill aimed at protecting students in the event of the sudden closure of a higher education institution. As of October 22, the measure had 11 co-sponsors. Among its various provisions, the Stop College Act of 2019 (H.R. 4615) would require accrediting organizations to:

  • Review teach-out plans and agreements when the accreditor is notified by the U.S. Department of Education (USDE) of problems pointing to the potential closure of a college or university, a state removes an institution’s license to operate, or accrediting organizations place an institution on probation, show-cause, or equivalent status.

  • Monitor institutions whose ability to meet accreditation standards has declined, particularly related to financial responsibility requirements, as identified by USDE, an auditor or the accrediting organization, which may indicate that a closure is imminent.

  • Respond to complaints, monitor, and assess an institution’s records of student complaints within 30 days and submit such complaints to USDE and state agencies when appropriate.

Reauthorization Of The Higher Education Act

This important piece of legislation last was reauthorized in 2008. Early in 2019, there were hopes that reauthorization would occur by the end of this year. Hearings were held, key issues were identified, and legislators in both political parties have attempted to bring a comprehensive bill to fruition. On October 15, 2019 the House Committee on Education and Labor introduced the College Affordability Act (H.R. 4674), which is designed to achieve: a comprehensive overhaul of the higher education system that lowers the cost of college for students and families, improves the quality of higher education through stronger accountability, and expands opportunities by providing students the support and flexibility they need to succeed. Some of the main provisions under Title 1 of this proposed legislation are:

  • Ensures programs lead to gainful employment

  • Protects the integrity of non-profit institutions of higher education

  • Improves available post-secondary data

  • Improves the Federal Student Aid (FSA) office

  • Establishes an enforcement unit

More Articles from October 2019 TRENDS

THE VALUE OF GLANCING IN THE REARVIEW MIRROR

Indicates why it is worthwhile to examine professional literature archives to learn more about present day challenges involving both allied health and genomics. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on recently completing a two-year term as ASAHP President. Read More

 

THE DANCE OF LEGISLATION

A book published in 1973 bearing this title shows how over the decades, certain patterns continue to remain in effect. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses recent efforts to curtail waste, fraud, and abuse in programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, along with some reflections on how to reduce administrative expenditures. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes new activity in the regulatory domain, plus recently introduced legislation to protect students when colleges close and reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Death Rates By Marital Status For Adults Age 25 And Older: United States, 2010-2017

  • Prevalence Of Screening For Social Determinants Of Health

  • Hierarchical Encoding Of Attended Auditory Objects In Multi-Talker Speech Perception

  • Exergaming And Virtual Reality For Health: Implications For Cardiac Rehabilitation Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Preparing The Current And Future Health Care Workforce For Interprofessional Practice

  • Integrating Social Care Into The Delivery Of Health Care

  • Older Americans’ Views On Navigating The Health Care System

  • Survey On State And Local Income, Poverty, And Health Insurance Statistics Read More

EVIDENCE FOR LATINO PREFERENCES FOR METAPHOR AND ANALOGY  

Mentions how a stronger liking for and a desire to connect with individuals who use metaphoric speech can have an impact on the quality of health care services. Read More

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE AFFECTS WOMEN AND MEN DIFFERENTLY

Refers to a recognition that the two groups differ in the risk of developing this disease, how it progresses, and survivor rates. Read More

 

LEARNING ABOUT FIDGETING WHILE FIDGETING

Despite efforts by parents and teachers to discourage children from fidgeting, this form of behavior may persist in adulthood, while a clearer understanding of its neural origins is enhanced by contributions made by expert mice. Read More

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Earlier this month, President Trump announced an Executive Order charging the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to propose annual changes to combat waste, fraud, and abuse in the Medicare program. From its inception in 1966, there have been policy concerns about installing program integrity methods to better protect taxpayers from fraud, waste, and abuse in Medicare. The challenge is to “pay it right,” which translates into paying the right amount, to legitimate providers, for covered, reasonable and necessary services made available to eligible beneficiaries while taking aggressive actions to eliminate fraud, waste, and abuse.

Government watchdogs routinely identify concerns about waste and abuse. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) has designated Medicare as a High Risk program since 1990 because of its size, complexity, and susceptibility to improper payments. In 2018, improper payments accounted for 5% of the total $616.8 billion of Medicare's net costs. As programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid become more complex, program integrity risks become increasingly difficult to recognize. New provider types have entered the program, including hospices, home health agencies, and federally qualified health centers. More challenging cross-ownership issues have emerged, such as one corporate parent owning various providers and provider types. Increasingly complex webs of affiliations can allow unscrupulous providers to simply appear, disappear if they come under scrutiny, and then re-appear as “new” entities.

When enacted into law, Medicare had 19 million beneficiaries. Today, there are almost 61 million of them and 10,000 new enrollees are added every day. When the programs began, Medicare and Medicaid accounted for only 2.3% of federal spending. That paltry amount has grown to 23.5% of federal outlays today. Some candidates hoping to be elected president of the U.S. are in favor of expanding Medicare, including making it a program that covers everyone in the U.S. even to the extent of eliminating private insurance coverage obtained through employment. Yet, rarely is it clearly stated how this expansion will be paid for without raising taxes nor is there any recognition of what mechanisms will be installed to combat chronic problems involving waste, fraud, and abuse.

Reducing Healthcare Administrative Costs

Following the success of enacting Medicare and Medicaid legislation in 1965 and making these programs available the next year, a steady drumbeat occurred throughout the remaining 1960s and much of the 1970s to expand the scope of coverage. The emphasis back then was to enact health insurance legislation to benefit a wider segment of the U.S. population. Health spending in the year 1960 was 5.2% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP). By 1970, it had increased to 6.9% while it currently is approaching nearly 20% of the world’s largest economy. The average cost of a stay in a hospital was $68 per day in 1970, but there were predictions that it could rise to $98 per day by 1973. Those figures seem risible in light of current health care spending patterns.

In late September 2019, the Omnibus Burden Reduction (Conditions of Participation) Final Rule came into effect in an effort to strengthen patient safety by removing unnecessary, obsolete, or excessively burdensome health regulations on hospitals and other healthcare providers. This rule is intended to advance CMS’s “Patients over Paperwork” initiative by saving providers an estimated 4.4 million hours previously spent on paperwork annually, with overall total provider savings projected to be approximately $8 billion over the next 10 years, giving physicians more time to spend with their patients.

Thousands upon thousands of regulations affect Medicare and Medicaid. CMS officials need to stay on the alert to determine where changes to obsolete, duplicative, or unnecessary requirements can be made to improve healthcare delivery and reduce unnecessary spending. An overall aim should be to improve patient care, jettison burdensome rules, and eliminate duplicative regulations. Voters would benefit from learning how political candidates for high public office would perform to achieve such objectives.

More Articles from October 2019 TRENDS

THE VALUE OF GLANCING IN THE REARVIEW MIRROR

Indicates why it is worthwhile to examine professional literature archives to learn more about present day challenges involving both allied health and genomics. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on recently completing a two-year term as ASAHP President. Read More

 

THE DANCE OF LEGISLATION

A book published in 1973 bearing this title shows how over the decades, certain patterns continue to remain in effect. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses recent efforts to curtail waste, fraud, and abuse in programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, along with some reflections on how to reduce administrative expenditures. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes new activity in the regulatory domain, plus recently introduced legislation to protect students when colleges close and reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Death Rates By Marital Status For Adults Age 25 And Older: United States, 2010-2017

  • Prevalence Of Screening For Social Determinants Of Health

  • Hierarchical Encoding Of Attended Auditory Objects In Multi-Talker Speech Perception

  • Exergaming And Virtual Reality For Health: Implications For Cardiac Rehabilitation Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Preparing The Current And Future Health Care Workforce For Interprofessional Practice

  • Integrating Social Care Into The Delivery Of Health Care

  • Older Americans’ Views On Navigating The Health Care System

  • Survey On State And Local Income, Poverty, And Health Insurance Statistics Read More

EVIDENCE FOR LATINO PREFERENCES FOR METAPHOR AND ANALOGY  

Mentions how a stronger liking for and a desire to connect with individuals who use metaphoric speech can have an impact on the quality of health care services. Read More

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE AFFECTS WOMEN AND MEN DIFFERENTLY

Refers to a recognition that the two groups differ in the risk of developing this disease, how it progresses, and survivor rates. Read More

 

LEARNING ABOUT FIDGETING WHILE FIDGETING

Despite efforts by parents and teachers to discourage children from fidgeting, this form of behavior may persist in adulthood, while a clearer understanding of its neural origins is enhanced by contributions made by expert mice. Read More

THE DANCE OF LEGISLATION

A book published in 1973 with the title, “The Dance of Legislation” by Eric Redman provided a thorough, credible account of the legislative process involving an effort to pass S.4106, the National Health Service Bill. The essence of the book’s material enables readers to appreciate the various forms of bureaucratic infighting that occurred, political prerogatives, and Congressional courtesies required to achieve a favorable outcome.

While the assortment of lions and lionesses on Capitol Hill back then has long since departed the legislative scene, a strong case may be made that nothing significant has changed over the past several decades. The current political scene includes talk of impeaching President Trump, but that distraction is just one of many factors contributing to a general sense of paralysis affecting the ability to pass needed forms of legislation. A case in point is the necessity of reauthorizing the Higher Education Act (HEA).

Last reauthorized in 2008 for a five-year period, the six years since then have enabled the contents of this legislation to continue to be implemented. Fortunately, although technically it could be declared null and void at any time, its provisions are too important to be placed on the chopping bock. A downside, however, is that changes need to be made in order to achieve a more perfect accommodation with changing times and situations since 2008.

This piece of legislation, along with other important considerations such as immigration policy, constitute bottlenecks that can erupt at many different points. Apart from partisan disagreements that can lead to delays, even when both chambers are ruled by the same party, important differences may exist. The fact that in 2019 Democrats are the majority in the House of Representatives while Republicans have more favorable numbers in the Senate adds to the challenge of overcoming certain impediments that result in legislation being stalled.

Even within the two parties, disagreements may arise. A member from a state with strong agricultural interests may not always share the same outlook of a colleague whose constituents may have a stronger maritime focus. The same holds true when a member of Congress represents predominantly urban rather than rural interests. Ultimately, each Representative and Senator is beholden to addressing the needs and interests of voters back home. If perceived as failing to do so, there is a risk of not being reelected.

Strenuous efforts continue to be exerted to pass appropriations legislation. The 2020 fiscal year began on October 1 of this year without funding bills being signed into law. One or more continuing resolutions (CRs) enable the government to continue operating until such time that a more permanent agreement can be reached. It will not be long until the end of the calendar year is reached and a new Congressional session will begin next January.

The year 2020 will involve a national election, including who will occupy the White House in 2021. Republicans campaigning will blame Democrats for blocking legislative achievements. Democrats will point to their do-nothing Republican opponents and insist on voting them out of office. Some things never change, thus ensuring that the dance of legislation will continue uninterrupted for the forseeable future.

More Articles from October 2019 TRENDS

THE VALUE OF GLANCING IN THE REARVIEW MIRROR

Indicates why it is worthwhile to examine professional literature archives to learn more about present day challenges involving both the health workforce and genomics. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on recently completing a two-year term as ASAHP President. Read More

 

THE DANCE OF LEGISLATION

A book published in 1973 bearing this title shows how over the decades, certain patterns continue to remain in effect. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses recent efforts to curtail waste, fraud, and abuse in programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, along with some reflections on how to reduce administrative expenditures. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes new activity in the regulatory domain, plus recently introduced legislation to protect students when colleges close and reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Death Rates By Marital Status For Adults Age 25 And Older: United States, 2010-2017

  • Prevalence Of Screening For Social Determinants Of Health

  • Hierarchical Encoding Of Attended Auditory Objects In Multi-Talker Speech Perception

  • Exergaming And Virtual Reality For Health: Implications For Cardiac Rehabilitation Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Preparing The Current And Future Health Care Workforce For Interprofessional Practice

  • Integrating Social Care Into The Delivery Of Health Care

  • Older Americans’ Views On Navigating The Health Care System

  • Survey On State And Local Income, Poverty, And Health Insurance Statistics Read More

EVIDENCE FOR LATINO PREFERENCES FOR METAPHOR AND ANALOGY  

Mentions how a stronger liking for and a desire to connect with individuals who use metaphoric speech can have an impact on the quality of health care services. Read More

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE AFFECTS WOMEN AND MEN DIFFERENTLY

Refers to a recognition that the two groups differ in the risk of developing this disease, how it progresses, and survivor rates. Read More

 

LEARNING ABOUT FIDGETING WHILE FIDGETING

Despite efforts by parents and teachers to discourage children from fidgeting, this form of behavior may persist in adulthood, while a clearer understanding of its neural origins is enhanced by contributions made by expert mice. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER—ASAHP MEMBER FOCUS

Susan.jpg

By Susan N. Hanrahan, ASAHP President

Well, I am ‘fresh off” the Annual Conference and what a week it was. I am not sure I have a favorite time, place or event but all of the speakers and activities had significance and seemed to resonate with one or more aspects of my life. Thanks to everyone who was able to attend. For those that did not, you can check out our website and access some of the plenary and concurrent session presentations----it was a very inspirational week.

Here are a couple of things you might have missed. We did approve to change the name of our organization to “Association of Schools Advancing Health Professions”. The logo “appears” the same but is a little more dynamic to fit the nature of our ever evolving world. People seemed excited about it and we are ready to move forward. The name change is also a perfect segue to our Strategic Planning Initiative announced by your new President, Phyllis King. This will happen in January and I am sure there will be opportunities for you to provide input.

For those that participated in the Institutional Profile Survey, you received your copy of the report prior to the Annual Conference. It is broken out into three sections---all institutions, academic health centers and 4-year institutions. Our contract group, Altegra Tech, has been instrumental in almost all aspects of the development of the survey and its reporting. The more all of us work on it, the more everyone understands the intricacies of the data and the questions themselves. We still have some minor tweaks for the 2018-2019 data collection instrument (i.e., survey) but it will be available soon for your university numbers. If you want to get the final survey report for 2018-2019, you have to participate in this year’s reporting so check your inbox in the next few weeks for a request to participate.

For the current data set, we will be working to share some additional reports as we continue to refine the data. If there are particular questions you would like for us to answer or tables you would like to see, please let Kristen Truong know. By the way, she received the President’s Award at the conference and deserved every accolade she received. She has been a tremendous asset for ASAHP and I want to thank her, Kate Aultman (former member who validated our data), all of the subcommittees, task forces members that helped prepare questions and edit the survey and Chris Yokely and his team at Altegra Tech for their work on the IPS. Thanks to all of you again for your patience.

Since this will be my last note to you (except for the Annual Report synopsis), let me just say I hope you feel more connected to each other. The Member Q&As were meant to “share secrets” about some of us that we often never “learn” in our associations with one another. In addition, the dedicated list serve (was a member request) was deployed so I hope you will increase your utilization of it with information you might want to share with members or for questions that need to be answered. I want to thank my BOD for their support over my 2-year presidency, the committee and task force chairs and their members that worked to get even more accomplished on our behalf and to the ASAHP staff (including Tom Elwood who produces this letter). I hope each of you will take some time to personally invest in ASAHP—it is a rewarding effort. Phyllis King will be awaiting your volunteerism call. I will serve one more year as past president so please continue to reach out to me for “anything” the Association can help you with.

A new decade—a new Association name—a new President --- a new strategic plan (in progress). Here we go!!!! Let’s have more fun!!

Susan Hanrahan, President/Past President

More Articles from October 2019 TRENDS

THE VALUE OF GLANCING IN THE REARVIEW MIRROR

Indicates why it is worthwhile to examine professional literature archives to learn more about present day challenges involving both allied health and genomics. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on recently completing a two-year term as ASAHP President. Read More

 

THE DANCE OF LEGISLATION

A book published in 1973 bearing this title shows how over the decades, certain patterns continue to remain in effect. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses recent efforts to curtail waste, fraud, and abuse in programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, along with some reflections on how to reduce administrative expenditures. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes new activity in the regulatory domain, plus recently introduced legislation to protect students when colleges close and reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Death Rates By Marital Status For Adults Age 25 And Older: United States, 2010-2017

  • Prevalence Of Screening For Social Determinants Of Health

  • Hierarchical Encoding Of Attended Auditory Objects In Multi-Talker Speech Perception

  • Exergaming And Virtual Reality For Health: Implications For Cardiac Rehabilitation Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Preparing The Current And Future Health Care Workforce For Interprofessional Practice

  • Integrating Social Care Into The Delivery Of Health Care

  • Older Americans’ Views On Navigating The Health Care System

  • Survey On State And Local Income, Poverty, And Health Insurance Statistics Read More

EVIDENCE FOR LATINO PREFERENCES FOR METAPHOR AND ANALOGY  

Mentions how a stronger liking for and a desire to connect with individuals who use metaphoric speech can have an impact on the quality of health care services. Read More

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE AFFECTS WOMEN AND MEN DIFFERENTLY

Refers to a recognition that the two groups differ in the risk of developing this disease, how it progresses, and survivor rates. Read More

 

LEARNING ABOUT FIDGETING WHILE FIDGETING

Despite efforts by parents and teachers to discourage children from fidgeting, this form of behavior may persist in adulthood, while a clearer understanding of its neural origins is enhanced by contributions made by expert mice. Read More

THE VALUE OF GLANCING IN THE REARVIEW MIRROR

Characteristically, many readers of periodicals look forward to each new issue to obtain valuable insights. Yet, there also may be considerable value in exploring professional literature archives as a means of obtaining an enhanced understanding of current challenges and perceived dilemmas. During the October 2019 conference of the Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions, it was announced that as of that day the new name would be the Association of Schools Advancing Health Professions, a term that represents the third occasion such a change has occurred since the organization was founded in 1967.

Allied health has a rich history. The federal government provided $276,495,000 between 1967 and 1979 after the Allied Health Professions Personnel Act became law in 1966. While that amount may not sound like much, as measured by its value in purchasing power in dollars in the year 2019, it equates to more than $1.498 billion. Significantly, a portion of that money was directed to the Association and many institutions that belonged to it during that time period.

The Journal of Allied Health was founded in 1972. During its second year of existence, ASAHP’s first President—Darrel Mase—penned an article, “Allied Health-Today and Tomorrow” (reprinted in the Winter 2010 issue). In it, he discussed: interprofessional education; how professional territoriality can impede effective utilization of health manpower; the difficulty of obtaining hard data regarding manpower needs to determine numbers and kinds of allied health personnel needed; the proper ratio of auxiliary to primary personnel; and evaluation of the effects of expanded functions of auxiliary personnel on patient dynamics or practice economics.

That particular manuscript was preceded by an article in the New England Journal of Medicine on April 27, 1972 with the title, “Allied Health Manpower-Solution or Problem?” It contained a discussion of how health manpower analysis and inventories have produced an inappropriate concern with numbers rather than with actual job content, flexibility, and development. Moreover, if non-physician medical manpower is to improve the health system, tasks rather than numbers must be studied, management must be given more authority, and professionalism must be curtailed. Apart from the fact that the term manpower has been replaced by the expression workforce, much of the contents of both papers have relevance today.

To cite work in another field where it may be valuable to glance occasionally in the rearview mirror, it is worth noting that developments in genomics are anticipated to exert meaningful impacts on patient care. Issue 2 in 2006 of the journal Epigenetics furnishes a brief historical account of genetics and developmental biology, and how they diverged for a major part of the 20th century. Epigenetics is the field that attempted to unite them and provide new insights into the mechanisms for unfolding the genetic program for development. That achievement has the potential to affect the ability to continue experimenting with genome editing technologies, such as CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) to go beyond only tweaking what already exists in a genome.

More Articles from October 2019 TRENDS

THE VALUE OF GLANCING IN THE REARVIEW MIRROR

Indicates why it is worthwhile to examine professional literature archives to learn more about present day challenges involving both allied health and genomics. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on recently completing a two-year term as ASAHP President. Read More

 

THE DANCE OF LEGISLATION

A book published in 1973 bearing this title shows how over the decades, certain patterns continue to remain in effect. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses recent efforts to curtail waste, fraud, and abuse in programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, along with some reflections on how to reduce administrative expenditures. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes new activity in the regulatory domain, plus recently introduced legislation to protect students when colleges close and reauthorization of the Higher Education Act. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Death Rates By Marital Status For Adults Age 25 And Older: United States, 2010-2017

  • Prevalence Of Screening For Social Determinants Of Health

  • Hierarchical Encoding Of Attended Auditory Objects In Multi-Talker Speech Perception

  • Exergaming And Virtual Reality For Health: Implications For Cardiac Rehabilitation Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Preparing The Current And Future Health Care Workforce For Interprofessional Practice

  • Integrating Social Care Into The Delivery Of Health Care

  • Older Americans’ Views On Navigating The Health Care System

  • Survey On State And Local Income, Poverty, And Health Insurance Statistics Read More

EVIDENCE FOR LATINO PREFERENCES FOR METAPHOR AND ANALOGY  

Mentions how a stronger liking for and a desire to connect with individuals who use metaphoric speech can have an impact on the quality of health care services. Read More

 

PARKINSON’S DISEASE AFFECTS WOMEN AND MEN DIFFERENTLY

Refers to a recognition that the two groups differ in the risk of developing this disease, how it progresses, and survivor rates. Read More

 

LEARNING ABOUT FIDGETING WHILE FIDGETING

Despite efforts by parents and teachers to discourage children from fidgeting, this form of behavior may persist in adulthood, while a clearer understanding of its neural origins is enhanced by contributions made by expert mice. Read More

THE ROLE OF ACCIDENTS ON THE PATHWAY TO INJURY AND DEATH

As the third leading cause of death in the U.S., accidents involve all age groups. Adoption of prevention measures has enormous potential to avoid such outcomes, but producing an accident-free environment continues to be a major uphill struggle. Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of injury and death for adolescents in this country. A possible developmental source of crash risk is working memory (WM). Results of a study published on September 13, 2019 in JAMA Network Open suggest that a relatively slower WM growth trajectory is associated with young driver crashes. Routine assessment of WM across adolescence may help to identify opportunities for providing adaptive interventions. Meanwhile, a correspondent who occasionally provides information proved useful for inclusion among views expressed in ASAHP’s newsletter TRENDS confessed earlier this month to incurring a severe wound by attempting to remove an avocado pit with a knife. The injury occurs frequently enough that it is referred to as “avocado hand,” a condition that results in making a dash to an emergency room for treatment. More precisely, the expression “post-brunch surge” of avocado-related injuries is being used to describe hand wounds sustained on Saturdays. A suggested remedy is to post safety labels on this fruit.

UNCERTAINTY IN RELATION TO EXISTENTIALISM

Indicates the importance of conducting more research on the topic of uncertainty, an incompletely understood phenomenon. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER—ASAHP MEMBER FOCUS

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on the upcoming ASAHP Annual Conference from the standpoint of speakers, a leadership panel, and the Business Meeting, along with updated information about the Association’s Institutional Profile Survey. Read More

AVOIDING A GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

Describes legislation involving appropriations for fiscal year 2020 that begins on October 1, 2019 and action underway to reduce pharmaceutical costs. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses questions pertaining to enactment of proposed Medicare For All Legislation. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes finalization of stricter rules for student loan claims and trends in the ratio of the Pell Grant to total price of attendance and federal loan receipt. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Mortality Patterns Between States With Highest Death Rates And States With Lowest Death Rates

  • Comparing Retail Clinics With Other Sites Of Care

  • The Use Of Small-Scale, Soft Continuum Robots To Navigate In Cerebrovascular Areas

  • The Use Of “Phyjamas” In Health Care Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Hospital Concentration Index

  • Reducing Inequities In Healthy Life Expectancy

  • Investing In Interventions That Address Non-Medical, Health-Related Social Needs Read More

BALEFUL IMPACT OF WORKPLACE INCIVILITY ON HEALTH

Mentions how dissimilarity in political identity can relate to reducing the quality of interpersonal interactions and subsequent well-being of workers. Read More

 

“BURNOUT” AND EARLIER SOMATIC PHENOMENA

Refers to a possible relationship between burnout in the 21st century and neurasthenia in an earlier century. Read More

“BURNOUT” AND EARLIER SOMATIC PHENOMENA

Professional health literature is replete with examples of how clinicians are adversely affected by burnout, a term applied to a variety of imprecise symptoms associated with the onset of conditions involving stress, fatigue, and depression. A question worth pondering is whether burnout is the equivalent terminologically of old wine in a new bottle? A paper appearing in the September 2019 issue of the periodical The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease rephases the questions as follows: Is today's 21st century burnout an earlier century's neurasthenia? Viewed in this light, the author advances a proposition that "stress" of all kinds (itself a fuzzy concept), including overwork, discouragement, disillusionment, demoralization, and even suicide, have been known as an accompaniment of training and practice for decades. Is something catastrophic happening or are practitioners merely being swept along in a profound, but ill-defined contagious tide of discontent? Is burnout merely this era's zeitgeist, the remnant of "compassion fatigue" of "wounded warriors" of years past, or neurasthenia of the 1900s? In an effort to conclude on a positive note, an observation is made that hysteria, neurasthenia, hypochondriasis, and other conditions all have had their day and cultish followers. With better definition of the problem(s) comes more effective interventions. The author considers the possibility that burnout most likely will experience the same historical reality of earlier variants.

UNCERTAINTY IN RELATION TO EXISTENTIALISM

Indicates the importance of conducting more research on the topic of uncertainty, an incompletely understood phenomenon. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER—ASAHP MEMBER FOCUS

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on the upcoming ASAHP Annual Conference from the standpoint of speakers, a leadership panel, and the Business Meeting, along with updated information about the Association’s Institutional Profile Survey. Read More

AVOIDING A GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

Describes legislation involving appropriations for fiscal year 2020 that begins on October 1, 2019 and action underway to reduce pharmaceutical costs. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses questions pertaining to enactment of proposed Medicare For All Legislation. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes finalization of stricter rules for student loan claims and trends in the ratio of the Pell Grant to total price of attendance and federal loan receipt. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Mortality Patterns Between States With Highest Death Rates And States With Lowest Death Rates

  • Comparing Retail Clinics With Other Sites Of Care

  • The Use Of Small-Scale, Soft Continuum Robots To Navigate In Cerebrovascular Areas

  • The Use Of “Phyjamas” In Health Care Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Hospital Concentration Index

  • Reducing Inequities In Healthy Life Expectancy

  • Investing In Interventions That Address Non-Medical, Health-Related Social Needs Read More

BALEFUL IMPACT OF WORKPLACE INCIVILITY ON HEALTH

Mentions how dissimilarity in political identity can relate to reducing the quality of interpersonal interactions and subsequent well-being of workers. Read More

 

THE ROLE OF ACCIDENTS ON THE PATHWAY TO INJURY AND DEATH

Examines factors pertaining to death and injury of adolescents from motor vehicle accidents and adult mishaps stemming from attempts to remove an avocado pit with a knife. Read More

BALEFUL IMPACT OF WORKPLACE INCIVILITY ON HEALTH

The political realm has long served as a venue for conflict among individuals and groups with widely different opinions on important public policy issues. A new study indicates that the worksite is not immune to the expression of opposing points of view. As noted in the results of a study published in the August 2019 issue of the journal Stress & Health, the workplace is an environment where individuals have little choice about with whom they interact. As such, employees may find themselves engaged in conversations with co-workers whose political opinions and perspectives are divergent from their own. The investigation examined how co-workers' dissimilarity in political identity is related to the quality of their interpersonal interactions and subsequent well‐being. The authors predicted that political identity dissimilarity is associated with experiences of workplace incivility and, in turn, declines in psychological and occupational well‐being. Hypotheses were tested in a four‐wave survey study conducted during the 2012 U.S. presidential election. The results indicated that political identity dissimilarity was associated with increased reports of incivility experiences instigated by co-workers, which in turn, was associated with increased burnout and turnover intentions and diminished job satisfaction. Several practical implications for organizations are offered in the manuscript.

UNCERTAINTY IN RELATION TO EXISTENTIALISM

Indicates the importance of conducting more research on the topic of uncertainty, an incompletely understood phenomenon. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER—ASAHP MEMBER FOCUS

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on the upcoming ASAHP Annual Conference from the standpoint of speakers, a leadership panel, and the Business Meeting, along with updated information about the Association’s Institutional Profile Survey. Read More

AVOIDING A GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

Describes legislation involving appropriations for fiscal year 2020 that begins on October 1, 2019 and action underway to reduce pharmaceutical costs. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses questions pertaining to enactment of proposed Medicare For All Legislation. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes finalization of stricter rules for student loan claims and trends in the ratio of the Pell Grant to total price of attendance and federal loan receipt. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Mortality Patterns Between States With Highest Death Rates And States With Lowest Death Rates

  • Comparing Retail Clinics With Other Sites Of Care

  • The Use Of Small-Scale, Soft Continuum Robots To Navigate In Cerebrovascular Areas

  • The Use Of “Phyjamas” In Health Care Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Hospital Concentration Index

  • Reducing Inequities In Healthy Life Expectancy

  • Investing In Interventions That Address Non-Medical, Health-Related Social Needs Read More

 

“BURNOUT” AND EARLIER SOMATIC PHENOMENA

Refers to a possible relationship between burnout in the 21st century and neurasthenia in an earlier century. Read More

 

THE ROLE OF ACCIDENTS ON THE PATHWAY TO INJURY AND DEATH

Examines factors pertaining to death and injury of adolescents from motor vehicle accidents and adult mishaps stemming from attempts to remove an avocado pit with a knife. Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

Hospital Concentration Index

A small number of hospitals in many U.S. metro areas increasingly are seeing most of the country’s hospital admissions. Some 67% of U.S. metro areas, 75 cities and towns, had high concentrations of hospitals in 2012, but those figures increased by 2016. That year, some 81 metro areas had high concentrations of health care facilities. Rural areas tended to have more patients who sought their care from only a few hospitals. Health care spending in the United States is increasing and accounts for nearly 18% of U.S. economic activity. According to a new report from the Health Care Cost Institute, while policymakers continue to explore the contributors to this phenomenon at the national level, differing local trends add complexity, but critical detail, to the picture of how health care dollars are spent across the country. Investigators analyzed more than 1.8 billion health care claims for individuals with commercial insurance from 2012 to 2016. They computed measures of health care service prices and use, and other measures such as provider market structure for 112 local areas in 43 states. They found that not only did spending trends and drivers vary substantially across metro areas, they varied within metro areas when data were segmented into categories like inpatient, outpatient, and physician services. In summary, each metro had a different experience. The report can be obtained here.

Reducing Inequities In Healthy Life Expectancy

A September 2019 brief from the Urban Institute is one of an eight-part Catalyst series indicating what it would take to advance bold solutions over the next 50 years. Across the country, health care providers and public, private, and nonprofit payers are exploring solutions to help individuals meet their health-related social needs, particularly among Medicaid enrollees. Along the way, they are generating new insights and raising critical questions about what works. The brief highlights five bold approaches that could narrow inequities in health outcomes and healthy life : (1) Assess health-related social needs, (2) Build community resource networks, (3) Incentivize investments in non-medical services with health payoffs, (4) Provide sustainable financing, and (5) Align organizational policies and activities. Based on conversations with innovative thinkers and doers, three areas also were identified where today’s health care payers, plans, and providers need new data and analysis to accelerate promising solutions for improving health equity by better addressing individuals’ health-related social needs. They are: (1) Identify high-priority social needs, (2) Build an actionable evidence base of proven interventions, and (3) Assess strategies for integrating health, social services, and other systems. The brief can be obtained here.

Investing In Interventions That Address Non-Medical, Health-Related Social Needs

On April 26, 2019, the Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice of the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine held a public workshop to explore the potential effects of addressing non-medical, health-related social needs on improving population health and reducing health care spending in a value-driven health care delivery system. The presentations and discussions highlighted in this Proceedings of a Workshop provide a general discussion of the issues, trends, and the opportunities and challenges of investing in interventions that address patients’ non-medical, health-related social needs. The Proceedings can be obtained here.

UNCERTAINTY IN RELATION TO EXISTENTIALISM

Indicates the importance of conducting more research on the topic of uncertainty, an incompletely understood phenomenon. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER—ASAHP MEMBER FOCUS

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on the upcoming ASAHP Annual Conference from the standpoint of speakers, a leadership panel, and the Business Meeting, along with updated information about the Association’s Institutional Profile Survey. Read More

AVOIDING A GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

Describes legislation involving appropriations for fiscal year 2020 that begins on October 1, 2019 and action underway to reduce pharmaceutical costs. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses questions pertaining to enactment of proposed Medicare For All Legislation. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes finalization of stricter rules for student loan claims and trends in the ratio of the Pell Grant to total price of attendance and federal loan receipt. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Mortality Patterns Between States With Highest Death Rates And States With Lowest Death Rates

  • Comparing Retail Clinics With Other Sites Of Care

  • The Use Of Small-Scale, Soft Continuum Robots To Navigate In Cerebrovascular Areas

  • The Use Of “Phyjamas” In Health Care Read More

BALEFUL IMPACT OF WORKPLACE INCIVILITY ON HEALTH

Mentions how dissimilarity in political identity can relate to reducing the quality of interpersonal interactions and subsequent well-being of workers. Read More

 

“BURNOUT” AND EARLIER SOMATIC PHENOMENA

Refers to a possible relationship between burnout in the 21st century and neurasthenia in an earlier century. Read More

 

THE ROLE OF ACCIDENTS ON THE PATHWAY TO INJURY AND DEATH

Examines factors pertaining to death and injury of adolescents from motor vehicle accidents and adult mishaps stemming from attempts to remove an avocado pit with a knife. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

Mortality Patterns Between States With Highest Death Rates And States With Lowest Death Rates

A Data Brief from the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) in September 2019 indicates that the average age-adjusted death rate for the five states (AL, KY, MS, OK, WV) with the highest rates (926.8 per 100,000 standard population) was 49% higher than the rate for the five states (CA, CT, HI, MN, NY) with the lowest rates (624.0). Age-specific death rates for all age groups were higher for the states with the highest rates compared with the states with the lowest rates. Age-adjusted death rates were higher for non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black populations, but lower for the Hispanic population in states with the highest rates than in states with the lowest rates. The age-adjusted death rates for chronic lower respiratory diseases and unintentional injuries for the states with the highest rates (62.0 and 65.5, respectively) were almost doubled compared with the states with the lowest rates (31.0 and 35.8).

Comparing Retail Clinics With Other Sites Of Care

According to an article published in the September 2019 issue of the journal Medical Care, with primary care transforming from care delivered exclusively in a physician's office to care that can be delivered in multiple sites and through different means, such as virtually and in retail settings, it is important to critique what is being gained from this primary care transformation and what, if anything, is being lost. For instance, entrepreneurs, policymakers, and officials at pharmacy and hospital chains may believe that the retail clinic model of primary care should include complex service delivery. Yet, the current body of research does not furnish enough information about whether this belief is founded in reality. As long as much of what is known for evaluating retail clinic care involves proprietary data controlled by advocates of retail clinics, uses more simplistic assessments of cost and quality, and leaves out the patient experience, there remains much that is unknown about this type of primary care.

HEALTH TECHNOLOGY CORNER

The Use of Small-Scale, Soft Continuum Robots To Navigate In Cerebrovascular Areas

An article published on August 28, 2019 in the journal Science Robotics describes the development by Massachusetts Institute of Technology engineers of a magnetically steerable, thread-like robot that actively can glide through narrow, winding pathways, such as the labrynthine vasculature of the brain. In the future, this robotic thread may be paired with existing endovascular technologies, making it possible to guide the robot remotely through a patient's brain vessels to treat blockages and lesions quickly, such as those that occur in aneurysms and stroke. The latter is the number five cause of death and a leading cause
of disability in the United States. If acute stroke can be treated within the first 90 minutes or so, researchers believe that patients' survival rates could increase significantly. A hope is that designing a device to reverse blood vessel blockage within a so-called “golden hour” potentially could result in the avoidance of permanent brain damage.

The Use Of “Phyjamas” In Health Care

The Ubicomp 2019 Conference on September 11-13, 2019 in London featured a presentation by researchers at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst who developed physiological-sensing textiles that can be woven or stitched into sleep garments they have dubbed "phyjamas." They designed a new fabric-based pressure sensor and combined that with a triboelectric sensor, one activated by a change in physical contact, to develop a distributed sensor suite that could be integrated into loose-fitting clothing like pajamas. They also developed data analytics to fuse signals from many points that took into account the quality of the signal arriving from each location. They report that this combination allowed them to detect physiological signals across many different postures. By performing multiple user studies in both controlled and natural settings, they showed that they can extract heartbeat peaks with high accuracy, breathing rate with less than one beat per minute error, and predict sleep posture perfectly.

UNCERTAINTY IN RELATION TO EXISTENTIALISM

Indicates the importance of conducting more research on the topic of uncertainty, an incompletely understood phenomenon. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER—ASAHP MEMBER FOCUS

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on the upcoming ASAHP Annual Conference from the standpoint of speakers, a leadership panel, and the Business Meeting, along with updated information about the Association’s Institutional Profile Survey. Read More

AVOIDING A GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

Describes legislation involving appropriations for fiscal year 2020 that begins on October 1, 2019 and action underway to reduce pharmaceutical costs. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses questions pertaining to enactment of proposed Medicare For All Legislation. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes finalization of stricter rules for student loan claims and trends in the ratio of the Pell Grant to total price of attendance and federal loan receipt. Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Hospital Concentration Index

  • Reducing Inequities In Healthy Life Expectancy

  • Investing In Interventions That Address Non-Medical, Health-Related Social Needs Read More

BALEFUL IMPACT OF WORKPLACE INCIVILITY ON HEALTH

Mentions how dissimilarity in political identity can relate to reducing the quality of interpersonal interactions and subsequent well-being of workers. Read More

 

“BURNOUT” AND EARLIER SOMATIC PHENOMENA

Refers to a possible relationship between burnout in the 21st century and neurasthenia in an earlier century. Read More

 

THE ROLE OF ACCIDENTS ON THE PATHWAY TO INJURY AND DEATH

Examines factors pertaining to death and injury of adolescents from motor vehicle accidents and adult mishaps stemming from attempts to remove an avocado pit with a knife. Read More

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

What transpires in the nation’s capital can have dramatic effects on higher education institutions. An example is the amount of federal funding that is directed to these entities annually. A segment of higher education that is in the spotlight as the government’s current fiscal year ends at the close of September 2019 consists of historically black colleges and other minority-serving institutions. Passed by the U.S. House of Representatives, H.R. 2486 must be taken into consideration by the Senate. The purpose of this legislation is to reauthorize $255 million of mandatory funding each year for programs under Title III of the Higher Education Act, which provides grants to historically black colleges and other institutions that enroll a large share of minority students.

These programs also receive discretionary funding from Congress each year, but the mandatory add-on funding expires on September 30. Officials at the Department of Education have indicated that there are plans to carry over unused mandatory funds from the current fiscal year into future years, so that many existing grants would remain in effect regardless of whether the funding stream expires.

Finalizing Stricter Rules For Student Loan Fraud Claims

An overhaul of rules known as “borrower defense to repayment” is in the process of being officially finalized this month. The purpose of the new policy is to set a more stringent standard for when the government will eliminate the debt of borrowers who claim they were misled or deceived by their institution. A notable example occurred during the Obama Administration when rules were written following the collapse of the for-profit college company Corinthian Colleges in 2015, which resulted in tens of thousands of former students sending requests to the Department of Education for loan forgiveness. Currently, the backlog of existing "borrower defense" claims exceeds 170,000 applications, but the Department has not taken any action on these claims in more than one year.

Education Department Secretary Betsy DeVos has stated that fraud in higher education will not be tolerated by the Trump Administration, adding that the final rules include carefully crafted reforms that hold colleges and universities accountable, and treat students and taxpayers fairly. An expectation is that these newer more strict standards will result in the Department approving fewer borrower defense claims, thereby reducing the amount of loan forgiveness by an estimated $512 million per year. The entire package of regulations, which also curtails loan discharges for students whose schools suddenly close, is projected to save taxpayers more than $11 billion over the next decade.

The new rules are designed to allow borrowers to have their loans forgiven if they can show their institution in a misrepresentation, but they must prove additional elements demonstrating that they relied on the college's misrepresentation and also must document financial harm more extensively. Another major change is a requirement that borrowers apply for loan forgiveness within three years of leaving school. Opponents of the rules are expected to mount legal challenges.

Trends In Ratio Of The Pell Grant To Total Price Of Attendance And Federal Loan Receipt

A new Data Point issued in August 2019 by the U.S. Department of Education is based on figures from four iterations of the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS), a large, nationally representative sample survey of students that focuses on how they finance their postsecondary education. An emphasis is on the percentage of total price of attendance covered by Pell Grants and the percentage of Pell Grant recipients who received federal student loans for academic years 2003–04, 2007–08, 2011–12, and 2015–16. Overall, the percentage of total price of attendance (tuition and fees, plus the cost of room and board, books and supplies, transportation, and personal expenses) covered by Pell Grants has remained consistent for selected years between 2003–04 and 2015–16, with the exception of 2007–08. The percentage of total price of attendance covered by Pell Grants was lower in 2007–08 (20%) compared to the 24% covered in all other years (2003–04, 2011–12, and 2015–16). These grants covered more of the total price of attendance for students at public 2-year institutions compared to public 4-year institutions, private nonprofit 4-year institutions, and private for-profit institutions in all selected academic years be- tween 2003–04 and 2015–16.

UNCERTAINTY IN RELATION TO EXISTENTIALISM

Indicates the importance of conducting more research on the topic of uncertainty, an incompletely understood phenomenon. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER—ASAHP MEMBER FOCUS

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on the upcoming ASAHP Annual Conference from the standpoint of speakers, a leadership panel, and the Business Meeting, along with updated information about the Association’s Institutional Profile Survey. Read More

AVOIDING A GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

Describes legislation involving appropriations for fiscal year 2020 that begins on October 1, 2019 and action underway to reduce pharmaceutical costs. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses questions pertaining to enactment of proposed Medicare For All Legislation. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Mortality Patterns Between States With Highest Death Rates And States With Lowest Death Rates

  • Comparing Retail Clinics With Other Sites Of Care

  • The Use Of Small-Scale, Soft Continuum Robots To Navigate In Cerebrovascular Areas

  • The Use Of “Phyjamas” In Health Care Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Hospital Concentration Index

  • Reducing Inequities In Healthy Life Expectancy

  • Investing In Interventions That Address Non-Medical, Health-Related Social Needs Read More

BALEFUL IMPACT OF WORKPLACE INCIVILITY ON HEALTH

Mentions how dissimilarity in political identity can relate to reducing the quality of interpersonal interactions and subsequent well-being of workers. Read More

 

“BURNOUT” AND EARLIER SOMATIC PHENOMENA

Refers to a possible relationship between burnout in the 21st century and neurasthenia in an earlier century. Read More

 

THE ROLE OF ACCIDENTS ON THE PATHWAY TO INJURY AND DEATH

Examines factors pertaining to death and injury of adolescents from motor vehicle accidents and adult mishaps stemming from attempts to remove an avocado pit with a knife. Read More

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

The U.S. Census Bureau on September 10, 2019 released a report on Health Insurance Coverage In The United States: 2018. It revealed that in 2018, 8.5% of individuals, or 27.5 million, did not have health insurance at any point during the year. The uninsured rate and number of uninsured increased from 2017 (7.9% or 25.6 million). The percentage of beneficiaries with health insurance coverage for all or part of 2018 was 91.5%, lower than the rate in 2017 (92.1%). Between 2017 and 2018, the percentage with public coverage decreased 0.4 percentage points, and the percentage with private coverage did not statistically change. In 2018, private health insurance coverage continued to be more prevalent than public coverage, covering 67.3% of the population and 34.4% of the population, respectively. Of the subtypes of health insurance coverage, employer-based insurance remained the most common, covering 55.1% of the population for all or part of the calendar year.

Health insurance coverage is related to the highest level of education attained. Individuals with higher levels of educational attainment are more likely to have health insurance coverage than those with less education. In 2018, 96.6% of the population aged 26 to 64 with a graduate or professional degree had health insurance coverage, compared with 93.8% of the population with a bachelor’s degree, 85.1% of high school graduates, and 71.0% of the population with no high school diploma. Income is another contributing factor in coverage differences. In 2018, individuals in households with lower income had lower health insurance coverage rates than residents of households with higher income. In 2018, 86.2% of those in households with an annual income of less than $25,000 had health insurance coverage, compared with 96.8% of individuals in households with income of $150,000 or more. Inhabitants of households with lower income also had lower rates of private coverage and higher rates of public coverage. Children living in the south are more likely than children living in other parts of the nation to be without health insurance, and Hispanic children are more likely than children of other ethnicities to be uninsured.

Questions Pertaining To Enactment Of Proposed Medicare For All Legislation

Democrats competing to be the nominee by their party in the 2020 presidential election have expressed great enthusiasm for the enactment of proposed Medicare For All legislation. If such a law ever becomes a reality, its advantages include free coverage of benefits for all residents of the U.S. Not especially clear at this juncture, however, is how enough revenue will be generated to pay for such an expansion. Another issue worthy of consideration is how the Medicare program as it currently exists might undergo modification.

One aspect in particular is the Medicare Advantage Program. All baby boomers will be older than age 65 by the year 2030. Because one in every five residents will be at retirement age, Medicare enrollment can be expected to grow. By way of background, Medicare Advantage, the public-private health plan option available to Medicare beneficiaries, presently furnishes coverage for more than 22 million individuals, representing greater than one-third of all participants in Medicare. The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that current enrollment in Medical Advantage will increase to 29 million by the year 2025. A report from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services in September 2018 indicates that 99% of Medicare beneficiaries have access to at least one Medicare Advantage Plan. The firm Avalere Health estimates that Medicare Advantage beneficiaries have higher rates of clinical and social risk factors than Traditional Medicare beneficiaries: 64% are more likely to be enrolled in Medicare due to disability, 57% have a higher rate of mental illness, and 16% have higher rates of alcohol/drug/substance abuse.

Assuming that existing Medicare is unaffected by the outcome of the 2020 election, as more beneficiaries switch from Traditional Medicare into Medicare Advantage, plans can be expected to become an increasingly important driver of a quest for high-quality care. If Medicare For All becomes a reality instead, whether private insurance coverage will continue to exist remains an open question. If so, plans, providers, community partners, beneficiaries, and policymakers are going to have to cooperate in figuring out how to support current efforts and build new opportunities to improve beneficiary health and quality of life.

UNCERTAINTY IN RELATION TO EXISTENTIALISM

Indicates the importance of conducting more research on the topic of uncertainty, an incompletely understood phenomenon. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER—ASAHP MEMBER FOCUS

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on the upcoming ASAHP Annual Conference from the standpoint of speakers, a leadership panel, and the Business Meeting, along with updated information about the Association’s Institutional Profile Survey. Read More

AVOIDING A GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

Describes legislation involving appropriations for fiscal year 2020 that begins on October 1, 2019 and action underway to reduce pharmaceutical costs. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes finalization of stricter rules for student loan claims and trends in the ratio of the Pell Grant to total price of attendance and federal loan receipt. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Mortality Patterns Between States With Highest Death Rates And States With Lowest Death Rates

  • Comparing Retail Clinics With Other Sites Of Care

  • The Use Of Small-Scale, Soft Continuum Robots To Navigate In Cerebrovascular Areas

  • The Use Of “Phyjamas” In Health Care Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Hospital Concentration Index

  • Reducing Inequities In Healthy Life Expectancy

  • Investing In Interventions That Address Non-Medical, Health-Related Social Needs Read More

BALEFUL IMPACT OF WORKPLACE INCIVILITY ON HEALTH

Mentions how dissimilarity in political identity can relate to reducing the quality of interpersonal interactions and subsequent well-being of workers. Read More

 

“BURNOUT” AND EARLIER SOMATIC PHENOMENA

Refers to a possible relationship between burnout in the 21st century and neurasthenia in an earlier century. Read More

 

THE ROLE OF ACCIDENTS ON THE PATHWAY TO INJURY AND DEATH

Examines factors pertaining to death and injury of adolescents from motor vehicle accidents and adult mishaps stemming from attempts to remove an avocado pit with a knife. Read More

AVOIDING A GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

In a typical year, legislators find it to be extremely difficult to agree on 12 appropriations bills. The current fiscal year ends on September 30. Assuming that not all of these pieces of legislation have been signed into law by that date, a remedy exists in the form of continuing resolutions (CRs). One possibility could be to produce a CR to avoid a federal government shutdown at the end of the fiscal year (FY) on September 30. Such a short-term spending bill might, for example, extend current government funding into late November or early December.

Having left Capitol Hill for most of August, elected officials returned in September with the Senate Appropriations Committee approving spending allocations for all 12 subcommittees, along with Defense and Energy and Water Development spending bills by a party line vote of 16-15. While appropriators had planned to vote on the Labor, Health and Human Services (Labor-HHS) bill and State-Foreign Operations bills, proceedings had to be postponed because of abortion-related disputes regarding Title X grant funding. Disagreements over the topic of abortion have a long history of serving as a major impediment to reaching agreement.

The 302(b) top-line spending caps for FY 2020 were decided without input from House appropriators, who already have advanced the majority of their panel’s spending bills. Labor-HHS, which includes Education, will receive $187.7 billion, a $200 million amount that constitutes only a 1% increase over FY 2019 levels.

Regardless of party affiliation, it is quite likely that continued efforts will be made to deal with the problem of high pharmaceutical prices. The soaring cost of insulin offers a stark example of exorbitant drug pricing. More than 100 million individuals are either diabetic or pre-diabetic. Although the drug was invented in 1922, its inflated-adjusted per unit price has at least tripled between the 1990s and 2014. In the U.S., insulin costs per patient have nearly doubled from 2012 to 2016 ($2,864 vs $5,075). High prices of this nature are driving up health insurance premiums and creating unaffordable costs for patients.

Proposed solutions vary between Democrats and Republicans. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) is preparing to issue a plan to lower drug prices by directing the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary to negotiate the prices of the 250 drugs that are most expensive to Medicare each year and that lack competition of at least two other generic drugs, biologics, or biosimilars. Pharmaceutical manufacturers that do not negotiate or are unable to reach an agreement with the government would face a 75% penalty of the gross sales of the drug from the previous year. Other purported features include that lower drug prices would apply to both Medicare and private insurers, and that savings resulting from the lower-priced drugs would be directed to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for the development of new drugs and treatments. The legislation also proposes a $2,000 cap on Medicare beneficiary out-of-pocket spending starting in 2022.

Meanwhile, a more moderate alternative by Republicans has emerged from the Senate Finance Committee that would require manufacturers to issue rebates to the Medicare program if prices rise faster than inflation.

UNCERTAINTY IN RELATION TO EXISTENTIALISM

Indicates the importance of conducting more research on the topic of uncertainty, an incompletely understood phenomenon. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER—ASAHP MEMBER FOCUS

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on the upcoming ASAHP Annual Conference from the standpoint of speakers, a leadership panel, and the Business Meeting, along with updated information about the Association’s Institutional Profile Survey. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses questions pertaining to enactment of proposed Medicare For All Legislation. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes finalization of stricter rules for student loan claims and trends in the ratio of the Pell Grant to total price of attendance and federal loan receipt. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Mortality Patterns Between States With Highest Death Rates And States With Lowest Death Rates

  • Comparing Retail Clinics With Other Sites Of Care

  • The Use Of Small-Scale, Soft Continuum Robots To Navigate In Cerebrovascular Areas

  • The Use Of “Phyjamas” In Health Care Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Hospital Concentration Index

  • Reducing Inequities In Healthy Life Expectancy

  • Investing In Interventions That Address Non-Medical, Health-Related Social Needs Read More

BALEFUL IMPACT OF WORKPLACE INCIVILITY ON HEALTH

Mentions how dissimilarity in political identity can relate to reducing the quality of interpersonal interactions and subsequent well-being of workers. Read More

 

“BURNOUT” AND EARLIER SOMATIC PHENOMENA

Refers to a possible relationship between burnout in the 21st century and neurasthenia in an earlier century. Read More

 

THE ROLE OF ACCIDENTS ON THE PATHWAY TO INJURY AND DEATH

Examines factors pertaining to death and injury of adolescents from motor vehicle accidents and adult mishaps stemming from attempts to remove an avocado pit with a knife. Read More

PRESIDENT’S CORNER—ASAHP MEMBER FOCUS

susan.jpg

By Susan N. Hanrahan, ASAHP President

Time is really going way too fast!!! Our Annual Conference is right around the corner. I sure hope you are able to attend. This should be a good one.

We have continued to highlight Conference plenary speakers and other activities in our newsletters. I would like to point out that four “of our own” will be speaking at plenary sessions this year, including Dr. Randy Lambrecht, who is now President of the Aurora Research Institute and System VP of Advocate Aurora Health, Dr. Lisa Saladin, Provost and EVP for Academic Affairs at Medical University of South Carolina, Dr. Pat Walker, Dean Emeritus at Sacred Heart University, and Dr. Susan Cashin who is the Director of the Office of Performance Analytics at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Also representing one of our member institutions will be Dr. Mitchell Scheiman who is the Dean of Research at Salus University who will be delivering the Switzer Lecture. Provost Lori Gonzalez of the University of Tennessee Health Science Center will be back to serve on a leadership panel entitled Recruiting Strategies and Challenges that will be held Friday morning so we will be excited to see her again. There are MANY other esteemed speakers plus all of the poster and concurrent session presentations. It will be a great time.

The Business Meeting will actually host the Association Awards this year since we are “boating” on our usual awards evening. Please plan to attend because you will get updates on a number of activities and also be able to bring new business items at the end of the meeting when we will open it up for a “town hall” discussion. Be thinking of things you might want to chat about. Phyllis King, our President Elect, will also be sharing some highlights for her two-year term as president.

The Institutional Profile Survey has gotten some new “enhancements” based on your feedback and is about ready for its second data collection release. The first aggregated data report from our new survey is ready for its “reveal” and will be appearing in the boxes of those that completed the survey. So, if you did not fill out the survey and want the data next time, please take time to fill out the IPS when it is released to our member institutions. If you have questions on this, please ask myself or Kristen in the ASAHP office.

Lastly, you have received a Bylaws notice for a name change of our association. This has been a topic of conversation over the 25 years I have been an ASAHP member. The BOD discussed this in their summer 2018 meeting and in summer 2019 made a decision to offer you a name change. We will keep the ASAHP acronym and literally replace the word “allied” with “advancing.” Since we are educating the health workforce for the 21st Century, it is a very appropriate and timely change. I hope you will vote yes.

My last note to you as President will come after the Annual Conference. See you there!! Susan Hanrahan, President

UNCERTAINTY IN RELATION TO EXISTENTIALISM

Indicates the importance of conducting more research on the topic of uncertainty, an incompletely understood phenomenon. Read More

AVOIDING A GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

Describes legislation involving appropriations for fiscal year 2020 that begins on October 1, 2019 and action underway to reduce pharmaceutical costs. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses questions pertaining to enactment of proposed Medicare For All Legislation. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes finalization of stricter rules for student loan claims and trends in the ratio of the Pell Grant to total price of attendance and federal loan receipt. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Mortality Patterns Between States With Highest Death Rates And States With Lowest Death Rates

  • Comparing Retail Clinics With Other Sites Of Care

  • The Use Of Small-Scale, Soft Continuum Robots To Navigate In Cerebrovascular Areas

  • The Use Of “Phyjamas” In Health Care Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Hospital Concentration Index

  • Reducing Inequities In Healthy Life Expectancy

  • Investing In Interventions That Address Non-Medical, Health-Related Social Needs Read More

BALEFUL IMPACT OF WORKPLACE INCIVILITY ON HEALTH

Mentions how dissimilarity in political identity can relate to reducing the quality of interpersonal interactions and subsequent well-being of workers. Read More

 

“BURNOUT” AND EARLIER SOMATIC PHENOMENA

Refers to a possible relationship between burnout in the 21st century and neurasthenia in an earlier century. Read More

 

THE ROLE OF ACCIDENTS ON THE PATHWAY TO INJURY AND DEATH

Examines factors pertaining to death and injury of adolescents from motor vehicle accidents and adult mishaps stemming from attempts to remove an avocado pit with a knife. Read More

UNCERTAINTY IN RELATION TO EXISTENTIALISM

Now that debates are well underway involving candidates who seek to be the Presidential nominee in the 2020 election, the word existential has been associated with a claim that climate change poses such a threat. One view of existentialism is that it represents an effort by individuals to construct meaning out of a world characterized by chaos and uncertainty. The realm of health care may be viewed as offering a suitable template for a cursory exploration of how it happens to be influenced by the term uncertainty.

Attention was drawn to this matter in a paper appearing in the October 2019 issue of the Journal of Patient Education and Counseling. The authors’ contention is that uncertainty in health care is an extremely important, but incompletely understood phenomenon. They argue that improving an understanding of the many important aspects of uncertainty in health care will require a more systematic program of research based upon shared, integrative conceptual models and active, collaborative engagement of the broader research community.

Uncertainty not only may be considered an essential facet of human life and an integral problem of health care. It is the single, common challenge faced by every patient who receives health care and every clinician who provides it, along with administrators, payers, policymakers, and researchers who deliver, finance, regulate, and study it. In every one of these diverse activities undertaken by different actors, uncertainty of one form or another—arising from various sources, pertaining to any number of relevant issues, and formed and reformed through communication—provides the call to action, and provokes a variety of different responses.

At the level of patient-provider interactions, diagnostic misclassifications and errors can result in treatment that is inappropriate and harmful. Moreover, patients may be plagued by doubts and uncertainties about their ability to remain employed, have satisfactory health insurance coverage, and be able to meet out-of-pocket costs for health care. Medicare for All proposals by political candidates raise concerns regarding whether reimbursement policies will suffice to meet the costs experienced by clinicians and facilities, such as rural hospitals. Policymakers also are faced with the quandary of coping with the task of figuring out how to provide free health care without simultaneously necessitating a huge spike in taxation.

Studies that focus explicitly on uncertainty have grown in number and diversity, but the growth is not systematic because the research has developed organically, in an uncoordinated, piecemeal fashion. Developing a more systematic approach to uncertainty in health care has the potential to improve the clinical communication of uncertainty by providing health professionals with a coherent, comprehensive understanding of the uncertainties that arise in different circumstances, the diversity of responses to these uncertainties, the various approaches to communicating uncertainty, and the many competing goals of doing so. A positive end product of enhancing this field of research could be a more comprehensive, rational, deliberate approach to communicating and managing uncertainties.

PRESIDENT’S CORNER—ASAHP MEMBER FOCUS

Susan Hanrahan offers her thoughts on the upcoming ASAHP Annual Conference from the standpoint of speakers, a leadership panel, and the Business Meeting, along with updated information about the Association’s Institutional Profile Survey. Read More

AVOIDING A GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN

Describes legislation involving appropriations for fiscal year 2020 that begins on October 1, 2019 and action underway to reduce pharmaceutical costs. Read More

 

HEALTH REFORM DEVELOPMENTS

Discusses questions pertaining to enactment of proposed Medicare For All Legislation. Read More

 

DEVELOPMENTS IN HIGHER EDUCATION

Summarizes finalization of stricter rules for student loan claims and trends in the ratio of the Pell Grant to total price of attendance and federal loan receipt. Read More

QUICK STAT (SHORT, TIMELY, AND TOPICAL)

  • Mortality Patterns Between States With Highest Death Rates And States With Lowest Death Rates

  • Comparing Retail Clinics With Other Sites Of Care

  • The Use Of Small-Scale, Soft Continuum Robots To Navigate In Cerebrovascular Areas

  • The Use Of “Phyjamas” In Health Care Read More

AVAILABLE RESOURCES ACCESSIBLE ELECTRONICALLY

  • Hospital Concentration Index

  • Reducing Inequities In Healthy Life Expectancy

  • Investing In Interventions That Address Non-Medical, Health-Related Social Needs Read More

BALEFUL IMPACT OF WORKPLACE INCIVILITY ON HEALTH

Mentions how dissimilarity in political identity can relate to reducing the quality of interpersonal interactions and subsequent well-being of workers. Read More

 

“BURNOUT” AND EARLIER SOMATIC PHENOMENA

Refers to a possible relationship between burnout in the 21st century and neurasthenia in an earlier century. Read More

 

THE ROLE OF ACCIDENTS ON THE PATHWAY TO INJURY AND DEATH

Examines factors pertaining to death and injury of adolescents from motor vehicle accidents and adult mishaps stemming from attempts to remove an avocado pit with a knife. Read More